Unlock your success in business and in Life!

Dan Lok

Getting Things Done: 8 Golden Rules of Effective Delegation

Listen to the latest Dan Lok’s Podcasts

EPISODE 192

Getting Things Done: 8 Golden Rules of Effective Delegation

Imagine if you had to organize an event for 50 people all by yourself. It’s a bit overwhelming, especially since you have no idea how to find a venue or a caterer. So what could you do to lighten the work and find everything that you need? You delegate.

Some people are reluctant to assign tasks to other people, but you aren’t an expert at everything. Find people who are good at what they do to save you time and sanity. Now when it comes to delegation, there are 8 golden rules for delegating effectively.

1. Clarify The Task In Your Own Mind

In your own mind, clarify exactly what you want to get done. Who do you want to do those tasks? When is the deadline for the tasks? What are your desired outcomes, and how will you measure if they are successfully completed?

2. Decide Who You Will Delegate To

Who will be the people you will delegate tasks to? You want to choose people who are brilliant at that those types of tasks.

3. Have A Deadline

Have a deadline, or nothing gets done. The deadline should be realistic but challenging. When I give deadlines, I also make it a test if I’m working with someone new. I’ll tell them I need something done in one week although I really have two weeks. Do you know why?

I want to see if they can get the job done.  It’s my way to see if they can live up to the challenge because there are times in your business when you actually do need something done urgently. It’s better to find out earlier than later if someone is capable.

4. Communicate Your Plan Orally And In Writing

Communicate orally and in writing your plan for action. What do you want to do? In my case, I don’t even give my team a plan of action. I give them the core structure and the big picture and I let them figure out the rest on their own because I want them to grow.

I don’t want them to always be depending on me to figure things out so I purposely let them make their own mistakes. Then they learn their lesson and they are more experienced than before.

Ask people to provide progress reports daily or once a week. The frequency depends on the person, their skills and their needs.

5. Follow Up

People don’t do what you expect, they do what you inspect with respect. People expect someone to do something but the other person doesn’t live up to the expectation. What does that mean?

It means you have to follow up to make sure it gets done. It’s not your job to do it but it’s your job to make sure it gets done.

6. Delegate Authority

Rule number six, be sure to delegate the authority along with responsibility. I see this as the biggest problem because entrepreneurs delegate responsibility but not authority.

How can you expect the other person to do the job when they have to run every decision past you? If you’re micromanaging, you’re not delegating, you’re controlling them. You’ve got to give them authority, even if it means giving the authority to make mistakes that cost you money.

When your company is large enough, someone is making a mistake somewhere at any given time. It doesn’t matter, as long as it doesn’t kill the company because this will be an opportunity to learn.

7. Give Praise And Feedback

After they’ve completed the task, or after the project, you want to provide feedback and be a bit of a coach. If they did something wrong, don’t yell at them, but tell them what you expect next time. Give them praise and additional responsibilities.

8. Don’t Be Perfect

If you’re a perfectionist, you won’t get something started or finished. Don’t get concerned with details. It’s about progress, not perfection. Your bank teller isn’t going to ask if you did everything perfectly to get your check.

Perfection isn’t that important because in the big scheme of things, each of us is just a small speck in a big universe.  In about 100 years, most people won’t be remembered.

Knowing now how valuable it is to delegate, you want to start delegating now. Don’t be a control freak choking your own business to death. Don’t hesitate and don’t plan until you have it perfect. Just go and delegate.

Transcript

Dan Lok: Welcome to another episode of Dan Lok show. Today we are in actually New York City, and I’m with John Henry. Now John not only is an entrepreneur, but also a real estate investor as well as owns a venture capital company.

John Henry: That’s right.

Dan Lok: Now before we even talk about John’s story, I want to talk a little bit about this space.

John Henry: Let’s talk about it.

Dan Lok: Let’s talk about this space. Like what makes this space, co-working space, so special?

John Henry: First things first, thank you for having me on.

Dan Lok: Welcome man, welcome.

John Henry: Appreciate you. And look, what makes this space special is this is the proof right here. Like you’re on a one day trip, you came, you interviewed with Faiza, this content, that content lined up. We connected and it’s central in the city, a lotta energy here, there’s six floors.

Dan Lok: You can feel the entrepreneurial spirit.

John Henry: That’s right.

Dan Lok: The minute you walk in you can feel the hustling.

Want more strategies to take your life to the next level - without all the fluff? Discover all of Dan’s best-kept secrets to success in life and business in his latest book Unlock It.

Click here for more details on the book and claim your limited time
FREE bonuses if you do decide to order.

Get Your Copy of Unlock It!

Coming Summer 2019.

  • TV Show: Hustle
  • Linkedin
  • Instagram
  • YouTube
  • Twitter

Join the Conversation

SHARE THE LOVE

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Dan Lok: Welcome to another episode of Dan Lok show. Today we are in actually New York City, and I’m with John Henry. Now John not only is an entrepreneur, but also a real estate investor as well as owns a venture capital company.

John Henry: That’s right.

Dan Lok: Now before we even talk about John’s story, I want to talk a little bit about this space.

John Henry: Let’s talk about it.

Dan Lok: Let’s talk about this space. Like what makes this space, co-working space, so special?

John Henry: First things first, thank you for having me on.

Dan Lok: Welcome man, welcome.

John Henry: Appreciate you. And look, what makes this space special is this is the proof right here. Like you’re on a one day trip, you came, you interviewed with Faiza, this content, that content lined up. We connected and it’s central in the city, a lotta energy here, there’s six floors.

Dan Lok: You can feel the entrepreneurial spirit.

John Henry: That’s right.

Dan Lok: The minute you walk in you can feel the hustling.

John Henry: That’s right, and there’s a lot at WeWork’s, obviously, and this is … this, though, is billed as like the OG space, and there are a lot of veteran New York entrepreneurs here. There are several accelerators and several funds and stuff, and so yeah, I’m fortunate to be part of this community.
So we’re in Alley right now. Yeah, and that’s where we find ourselves.

Dan Lok: That’s awesome.

John Henry: Welcome to New York, man.

Dan Lok: Thank you, I love New York. The cold, it takes a couple of days to get used to. The minute I arrived, the airport, like wow! This is cold. I know New York, it’s cold. But this is cold!

John Henry: This is very cold.

Dan Lok: This is very cold. So John, take us back. How did you get into entrepreneurship?